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Why Causing Homelessness is a War Crime

By Jon Bourn
Editor Jericho Rendezvous Blog

According to a Twelve Year Study by Wanda Gray “The face of homelessness has drastically changed and alarmingly increased.” If you search this topic you will find the corporate state at work attempting to paint pictures that downplay the severity of this dilemma. In Sarasota Florida, they have actually removed the seats from Selby Five Points Park to prevent all people from using them (see here). Even though this is completely ignorant, it reveals the attitude of the corporate state which is the cause of the banking scandal of bailing out corporate buddies at the expense of the American public.

This details a significant change in the overall consensus that is derived from the security state manifested out of the bogus ‘war on terror’ and combined with the idea that economics is no longer an integral part of ecological sustainability. In fact, this new ‘war on people,’ and anyone who does not abide by the intrusion, is considered politically incorrect from both political parties. Just over the last two months the following articles reveal how bad the situation has become, and covering it up will become much more difficult.

Homelessness — A Twelve Year Study by Wanda Gray

Houston’s homeless population jumps 25 percent in one year and services struggle to keep up

Survey: Longmont’s homeless population up by 35 percent

New survey reveals age and the number of new homeless is rising in SF

Hawaii’s homeless rate is third worst in the nation.

Oregon Homeless Population Increases Again

Brevard schools see surge in homeless, at-risk students

Jobless rate increases ranks of Memphis homeless by 20 percent

Report Finds Homeless People on the Rise in San Mateo County

Homelessness on the rise, shelters say

Temecula Homeless Double in Two Years

646 homeless students in New Hanover County

As was stated above, this is an act of war on the middle class, and annihilation for anyone who is already suffering. It reminds us of a third world country where statistics already show that the U.S. has fallen in practically every category known to man.

The combination of false flag wars, Zionist security thinking, and the complete fabrication of economic stability, formulate a war game being played out before our very eyes. One that will likely leave the Earth barren if not stopped. By slipping funds into the hands of the U.S. and foreign banks, it is an obvious failure that can only be supported by the false security ploy which in turn depends on the Zionist idea that you are chosen to defend this false religious flag.

You know how it works, the question to ask yourself is ‘what should I do?’ Spreading the word alone will not suffice, or giving in to the enemy as was recently experienced in Texas, you may have to think like a Zionist to defeat them. We must understand how the phenomena is manifested and detail its implementation methods. This methodological activity clearly reveals what is happening, and how big-city mayors up to governors, quietly play their role almost seemingly oblivious implying their denial and rub that prevails.

All this leaves an empty hole that is in the story, but no one seems to be able to understand. It was an inside job. Trying to cover it up by removing the evidence will only make it worse. It is like releasing the beast. Let’s find a cure before it is too late.

According to many who research the past, this has been going on for a long time.

Naomi Klein – The Shock Doctrine: The Rise of Disaster Capitalism

In conclusion, it may even exist as a type of verbal overshadowing that must be continually propagated over the air waves to be sustained and held together by the implicit comparisons created on 09/11/2001. It operates completely in the dark, moving into areas left both from environmental and economical destruction buying up schools and businesses, increasing its power and control. All that it does destroys what has long been created that truly verbalizes our world.

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The Dice Are Stacked Against Humanity

By Noam Chomsky

The Dice Are Stacked Against Humanity

I’ll begin with an interesting debate that took place some years ago between Carl Sagan, the well-known astrophysicist, and Ernst Mayr, the grand old man of American biology. They were debating the possibility of finding intelligent life elsewhere in the universe. And Sagan, speaking from the point of view of an astrophysicist, pointed out that there are innumerable planets just like ours. There is no reason they shouldn’t have developed intelligent life. Mayr, from the point of view of a biologist, argued that it’s very unlikely that we’ll find any. And his reason was, he said, we have exactly one example: Earth. So let’s take a look at Earth.

And what he basically argued is that intelligence is a kind of lethal mutation. And he had a good argument. He pointed out that if you take a look at biological success, which is essentially measured by how many of us are there, the organisms that do quite well are those that mutate very quickly, like bacteria, or those that are stuck in a fixed ecological niche, like beetles. They do fine. And they may survive the environmental crisis. But as you go up the scale of what we call intelligence, they are less and less successful. By the time you get to mammals, there are very few of them as compared with, say, insects. By the time you get to humans, the origin of humans may be 100,000 years ago, there is a very small group. We are kind of misled now because there are a lot of humans around, but that’s a matter of a few thousand years, which is meaningless from an evolutionary point of view. His argument was, you’re just not going to find intelligent life elsewhere, and you probably won’t find it here for very long either because it’s just a lethal mutation. He also added, a little bit ominously, that the average life span of a species, of the billions that have existed, is about 100,000 years, which is roughly the length of time that modern humans have existed.

With the environmental crisis, we’re now in a situation where we can decide whether Mayr was right or not. If nothing significant is done about it, and pretty quickly, then he will have been correct: human intelligence is indeed a lethal mutation. Maybe some humans will survive, but it will be scattered and nothing like a decent existence, and we’ll take a lot of the rest of the living world along with us.

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Yang over Yin? Multi-dimensional Thinking

By Jon Bourn

Memory forms character, it cannot be made into stigma.

As with the void of politics which holds character in place as the illusion of prominence only to stigmatize a meditative media as propaganda. Instead of learning from these characters, they are used to prevent awakening to them and the horrible results they have offered the working people. Middle class begins when you realize these illusions. Those who adapt their belief to them, travel into the void as far as they conceive now reigning in their stigma in monetary form.

In the book, “In Search of the Miraculous,” P. D. Ouspensky writes about G. I. Gurdjieff who explains how stigma and our instincts are understood. His example was to drop change out of his pocket as he walked while you walked behind him, and of a particular group, at least one would immediately pick it up to alert Gurdjieff that he has dropped something. In essence, this shows how what he referred to as Astrology has embedded our neurons.

In relation to Astrology, the stigmas of a political party are formed on this basis where memory consumes stigma at the behest of acceptable behavior promulgated as a fury to be held high. The mirror is plain to see for those who see through it, for what is considered elite in today’s standards is visibly involved, such as revolt occurring in Wisconsin and the Koch Industries who have a fascist influence which can be best described as monetary dominance. “If we cannot keep our power in place, then others must be punished by our power.”

What is strongly in power on the right is also working to allude on the left as when the Vanity Fair is promulgated on the Jon Stewart show downplaying truth for all to see. It seems that the implication of gambling is being painted on the working people as cover.

Character does not belong but as an art. Main-streamy media propagates art as stigma to hide character. It is greedy extremists and psychopaths that help to create the chaos that has resulted. It is the overwhelming urge for character where none truly exists. Glenn Beck is a perfect example. Character encompasses a macro-ethos of all our learnings stemming out of the cataclysms on earth which are hidden from us with overlaying blackboard stigmas.

This monstrous ideology of control is now stigmatized beyond anything reasonable for society to exist, and to implement unity in a perceived commerce. It’s basic functions do not operate and we are left with the pony show. It is only referred to as Noam Chomsky places the context in a cold code word stability when it is the ideology of gods painted in the sky perpetuating pathocracy and pathological disorder.

Upon realizing the relation to social mathematics, we may see both the disease, and the cure, while knowing of its nature. The truth is that we are all in the same sinking ship as David DeGraw writes in relation to the instituted divide and conquer strategy in place and the extremists effects that pervade official culture.

To avoid the final delusion of ideology, we must see its power for what it truly is. It is comparable to condition a priori to environment and the mythos generation, to make the stigma amber as a doctrine. No condition can exist without memory, the vast character of history that represents the wave of time from cataclysm to the next. A medicine man sees condition as environment, not a priori to form character, but to see where change truly exists.

Just as Gilad Atzmon reveals the naked condition by calling a spade a spade, monetary force alludes the essence of the religious Faust where reaction dwells upon the painted bunting.

It is up to us to see the dropping of change for what it is. A character where none exists. The essence of the psychopaths. The gods of war.

A Recipe For Fascism

November 8, 2010 1 comment

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By Chris Hedges

A Recipe For Fascism

American politics, as the midterm elections demonstrated, have descended into the irrational. On one side stands a corrupt liberal class, bereft of ideas and unable to respond coherently to the collapse of the global economy, the dismantling of our manufacturing sector and the deadly assault on the ecosystem. On the other side stands a mass of increasingly bitter people whose alienation, desperation and rage fuel emotionally driven and incoherent political agendas. It is a recipe for fascism.

More than half of those identified in a poll by the Republican-leaning Rasmussen Reports as “mainstream Americans” now view the tea party favorably. The other half, still grounded in a reality-based world, is passive and apathetic. The liberal class wastes its energy imploring Barack Obama and the Democrats to promote sane measures including job creation programs, regulation as well as criminal proceedings against the financial industry, and an end to our permanent war economy. Those who view the tea party favorably want to tear the governmental edifice down, with the odd exception of the military and the security state, accelerating our plunge into a nation of masters and serfs. The corporate state, unchallenged, continues to turn everything, including human beings and the natural world, into commodities to exploit until exhaustion or collapse.

All sides of the political equation are lackeys for Wall Street. They sanction, through continued deregulation, massive corporate profits and the obscene compensation and bonuses for corporate managers. Most of that money—hundreds of billions of dollars—is funneled upward from the U.S. Treasury. The Sarah Palins and the Glenn Becks use hatred as a mobilizing passion to get the masses, fearful and angry, to call for their own enslavement as well as to deny uncomfortable truths, including global warming. Our dispossessed working class and beleaguered middle class are vulnerable to this manipulation because they can no longer bear the chaos and uncertainty that come with impoverishment, hopelessness and loss of control. They have retreated into a world of illusion, one peddled by right-wing demagogues, which offers a reassuring emotional consistency. This consistency appears to protect them from the turmoil in which they have been forced to live. The propaganda of a Palin or a Beck may insult common sense, but, for a growing number of Americans, common sense has lost its validity.

The liberal class, which remains rooted in a world of fact, rationalizes placating corporate power as the only practical response. It understands the systems of corporate power. It knows the limitations and parameters. And it works within them. The result, however, is the same. The entire spectrum of the political landscape collaborates in the strangulation of our disenfranchised working class, the eroding of state power, the criminal activity of the financial class and the paralysis of our political process.

Commerce cannot be the sole guide of human behavior. This utopian fantasy, embraced by the tea party as well as the liberal elite, defies 3,000 years of economic history. It is a chimera. This ideology has been used to justify the disempowerment of the working class, destroy our manufacturing capacity, and ruthlessly gut social programs that once protected and educated the working and middle class. It has obliterated the traditional liberal notion that societies should be configured around the common good. All social and cultural values are now sacrificed before the altar of the marketplace.

The failure to question the utopian assumptions of globalization has left us in an intellectual vacuum. Regulations, which we have dismantled, were the bulwarks that prevented unobstructed brutality and pillaging by the powerful and protected democracy. It was a heavily regulated economy, as well as labor unions and robust liberal institutions, which made the American working class the envy of the industrialized world. And it was the loss of those unions, along with a failure to protect our manufacturing, which transformed this working class into a permanent underclass clinging to part-time or poorly paid jobs without protection or benefits.

The “inevitability” of globalization has permitted huge pockets of the country to be abandoned economically. It has left tens of millions of Americans in economic ruin. Private charity is now supposed to feed and house the newly minted poor, a job that once, the old liberal class argued, belonged to the government. As John Ralston Saul in “The Collapse of Globalization” points out, “the role of charity should be to fill the cracks of society, the imaginative edges, to go where the public good hasn’t yet focused or can’t. Dealing with poverty is the basic responsibility of the state.” But the state no longer has the interest or the resources to protect us. And the next target slated for elimination is Social Security.

That human society has an ethical foundation that must be maintained by citizens and the state is an anathema to utopian ideologues of all shades. They always demand that we sacrifice human beings for a distant goal. The propagandists of globalization—from Lawrence Summers to Francis Fukuyama to Thomas Friedman—do for globalization and the free market what Vladimir Lenin and Leon Trotsky did for Marxism. They sell us a dream. These elite interpreters of globalism are the vanguard, the elect, the prophets, who alone grasp a great absolute truth and have the right to impose this truth on a captive people no matter what the cost. Human suffering is dismissed as the price to be paid for the coming paradise. The response of these propagandists to the death rattles around them is to continue to speak in globalization’s empty rhetoric and use state resources to service a dead system. They lack the vision to offer any alternative. They can function only as systems managers. They will hollow out the state to sustain a casino capitalism that is doomed to fail. And what they offer as a solution is as irrational as the visions of a Christian America harbored by many within the tea party.

We are ruled by huge corporate monopolies that replicate the political and economic power, on a vastly expanded scale, of the old trading companies of the 17th and 18th centuries. Wal-Mart’s gross annual revenues of $250 billion are greater than those of most small nation-states. The political theater funded by the corporate state is composed of hypocritical and impotent liberals, the traditional moneyed elite, and a disenfranchised and angry underclass that is being encouraged to lash out at the bankrupt liberal institutions and the government that once protected them. The tea party rabble, to placate their anger, will also be encouraged by their puppet masters to attack helpless minorities, from immigrants to Muslims to homosexuals. All these political courtiers, however, serve the interests of the corporate state and the utopian ideology of globalism. Our social and political ethic can be summed up in the mantra let the market decide. Greed is good.

The old left—the Wobblies, the Congress of Industrial Workers (CIO), the Socialist and Communist parties, the fiercely independent publications such as Appeal to Reason and The Masses—would have known what to do with the rage of our dispossessed. It used anger at injustice, corporate greed and state repression to mobilize Americans to terrify the power elite on the eve of World War I. This was the time when socialism was not a dirty word in America but a promise embraced by millions who hoped to create a world where everyone would have a chance. The steady destruction of the movements of the left was carefully orchestrated. They fell victim to a mixture of sophisticated forms of government and corporate propaganda, especially during the witch hunts for communists, and overt repression. Their disappearance means we lack the vocabulary of class warfare and the militant organizations, including an independent press, with which to fight back.

We believe, like the Spaniards in the 16th century who pillaged Latin America for gold and silver, that money, usually the product of making and trading goods, is real. The Spanish empire, once the money ran out and it no longer produced anything worth buying, went up in smoke. Today’s use in the United States of some $12 trillion in government funds to refinance our class of speculators is a similar form of self-deception. Money markets are still treated, despite the collapse of the global economy, as a legitimate source of trade and wealth creation. The destructive power of financial bubbles, as well as the danger of an unchecked elite, was discovered in ancient Athens and detailed more than a century ago in Emile Zola’s novel “Money.” But we seem determined to find out this self-destructive force for ourselves. And when the second collapse comes, as come it must, we will revisit wrenching economic and political tragedies forgotten in the mists of history.

Chris Hedges, who writes a weekly column for Truthdig, is the author of “Death of the Liberal Class.”

Related:

George Orwell, “Politics and the English Language,” 1946

A Few Words

By Jon Bourn
Editor of Jericho Rendezvous Blog

All that is left in America is pain. The coup d’etat is over. I personally stand at a cross road where my chances of survival have dwindled and the likelihood of loosing everything has risen dramatically. I’ll know the answer in the next few months along with millions of others who just disappear, and are left to fend in a world fraught with corruption. If you wonder why nothing changes, you may have part of the answer. Without money, evil says you are evil. I don’t buy it. It’s bad medicine. Work truly has nothing to do with it, we all want to do something. Hate mongers will tell you to get a job, but if the job doesn’t suffice, it is you that is to blame.

Our fear-induced elections, a sort of epitasis in the techo-stream of death will change nothing as Americans sleep through life to appease the evil that bestows them. Oblivious to knowledge, their moralism reigns. Why have we not learned what knowledge truly is? A simple description is that of the ladder and the position we take upon it. It’s length is perpetual traveling in both direction beyond sight leaving only one direction where morality remains and described by G. I. Gurdjeiff in the following quote:

“The more moral a man is, the more immoral does he think other moral people.”

Morality begins the process of discerning knowledge where reason is also developed and that which separates us homogeneously from non-human life. Our semantic world outlines how this is established in the mind. We begin the assumption with the root stem me-1 (pronounced like me), and this is immediately reflected as mē-1 (pronounced like measure), a derivative of moral. As we climb the ladder, our confusion is addressed between me-2 and mē-2. It is here that money is placed. The next two versions of me (mē-3, and mē-4) explain what happens once this is done; a total of 52 words in six root groups of the lexicon.

Surprisingly, this is an analogy to the universe built out of the lexicon as a pentimento of metaphorical efficiency. As an example, all measurement today is based on money, and it is here that the picture is painted. A glance at where our thoughts develop might change that picture and reveal the truer nature of the spirit and soul of our indigenous world. Money itself has no brain, it depends on us to make it real and this is called slavery to something that is unable to think.

Retribution for a World Lost in Screens

September 27, 2010 Leave a comment

By Chris Hedges

Retrubution for a World Lost in Screens

Nemesis was the Greek goddess of retribution. She exacted divine punishment on arrogant mortals who believed they could defy the gods, turn themselves into objects of worship and build ruthless systems of power to control the world around them. The price of such hubris was almost always death.

Nemesis, related to the Greek word némein, means “to give what is due.” Our nemesis fast approaches. We will get what we are due. The staggering myopia of our corrupt political and economic elite, which plunder the nation’s wealth for financial speculation and endless war, the mass retreat of citizens into virtual hallucinations, the collapsing edifices around us, which include the ecosystem that sustains life, are ignored for a giddy self-worship. We stare into electronic screens just as Narcissus, besotted with his own reflection, stared into a pool of water until he wasted away and died.

We believe that because we have the capacity to wage war we have the right to wage war. We believe that money, rather than manufactured products and goods, is real. We believe in the myth of inevitable human moral and material progress. We believe that no matter how much damage we do to the Earth or our society, science and technology will save us. And as temperatures on the planet steadily rise, as droughts devastate cropland, as the bleaching of coral reefs threatens to wipe out 25 percent of all marine species, as countries such as Pakistan and Bangladesh succumb to severe flooding, as we poison our food, air and water, as we refuse to confront our addiction to fossil fuels and coal, as we dismantle our manufacturing base and plunge tens of millions of Americans into a permanent and desperate underclass, we flick on a screen and are entranced.

We confuse the electronic image, a reflection back to us of ourselves, with the divine. We gawk at “reality” television, which of course is contrived reality, reveling in being the viewer and the viewed. True reality is obliterated from our consciousness. It is the electronic image that informs and defines us. It is the image that gives us our identity. It is the image that tells us what is attainable in the vast cult of the self, what we should desire, what we should seek to become and who we are. It is the image that tricks us into thinking we have become powerful—as the popularity of video games built around the themes of violence and war illustrates—while we have become enslaved and impoverished by the corporate state. The electronic image leads us back to the worship of ourselves. It is idolatry. Reality is replaced with electronic mechanisms for preening self-presentation—the core of social networking sites such as Facebook—and the illusion of self-fulfillment and self-empowerment. And in a world unmoored from the real, from human limitations and human potential, we inevitably embrace superstition and magic. This is what the worship of images is about. We retreat into a dark and irrational fear born out of a cavernous ignorance of the real. We enter an age of technological barbarism.

To those entranced by images, the world is a vast stage on which they are called to enact their dreams. It is a world of constant action, stimulation and personal advancement. It is a world of thrills and momentary ecstasy. It is a world of ceaseless movement. It makes a fetish of competition. It is a world where commercial products and electronic images serve as a pseudo-therapy that caters to feelings of alienation, inadequacy and powerlessness. We may be locked in dead-end jobs, have no meaningful relationships and be confused about our identities, but we can blast our way to power holding a little control panel while looking for hours at a screen. We can ridicule the poor, the ignorant and the weak all day long on trash-talk shows and reality television shows. We are skillfully made to feel that we have a personal relationship, a false communion, with the famous—look at the outpouring of grief at the death of Princess Diana or Michael Jackson. We have never met those we adore. We know only their manufactured image. They appear to us on screens. They are not, at least to us, real people. And yet we worship and seek to emulate them.

In this state of cultural illusion any description of actual reality, because it does not consist of the happy talk that pollutes the airwaves from National Public Radio to Oprah, is dismissed as “negative” or “pessimistic.” The beleaguered Jeremiahs who momentarily stumble into our consciousness and in a desperate frenzy seek to warn us of our impending self-destruction are derided because they do not lay out easy formulas that permit us to drift back into fantasy. We tell ourselves they are overreacting. If reality is a bummer, and if there are no easy solutions, we don’t want to hear about it. The facts of economic and environmental collapse, now incontrovertible, cannot be discussed unless they are turned into joking banter or come accompanied with a neat, pleasing solution, the kind we are fed at the conclusion of the movies, electronic games, talk shows and sitcoms, the kind that dulls our minds into passive and empty receptacles. We have been conditioned by electronic hallucinations to expect happy talk. We demand it.

We confuse this happy talk with hope. But hope is not about a belief in progress. Hope is about protecting simple human decency and demanding justice. Hope is the belief, not necessarily grounded in the tangible, that those whose greed, stupidity and complacency have allowed us to be driven over a cliff shall one day be brought down. Hope is about existing in a perpetual state of rebellion, a constant antagonism to all centers of power. The great moral voices, George Orwell and Albert Camus being perhaps two of the finest examples, describe in moving detail the human suffering we ignore or excuse. They understand that the greatest instrument for moral good is the imagination. The ability to perceive the pain and suffering of another, to feel, as King Lear says, what wretches feel, is a more powerful social corrective than the shelves of turgid religious and philosophical treatises on human will. Those who change the world for the better, who offer us hope, have the capacity to make us step outside of ourselves and feel empathy.

A print-based culture, as writer Neil Postman pointed out, demands rationality. The sequential, propositional character of the written word fosters what Walter Ong calls the “analytic management of knowledge.” But our brave new world of images dispenses with these attributes because the images do not require them to be understood. Communication in the image-based culture is not about knowledge. It is about the corporate manipulation of emotions, something logic, order, nuance and context protect us against. Thinking, in short, is forbidden. Entertainment and spectacle have become the aim of all human endeavors, including politics, which is how Stephen Colbert, playing his television character, can be permitted to testify before the House Judiciary Committee. Campaigns are built around the manufactured personal narratives of candidates, who function as political celebrities, rather than policies or ideas. News reports have become soap operas and mini-dramas revolving around the latest celebrity scandal.
Colleges and universities, which view students as customers and suck obscene tuition payments and loans out of them with the tantalizing promise of high-paying corporate jobs, have transformed themselves into resorts and theme parks. In this new system of education almost no one fails. Students become “brothers” or “sisters” in the atavistic, tribal embrace of eating clubs, fraternities or sororities. School spirit and school branding is paramount. Campus security keeps these isolated enclaves of privilege secure. And 90,000-seat football stadiums, along with their millionaire coaches, dominate the campus. It is moral leprosy.

The role of knowledge and art, as the ancient Greeks understood, is to create ekstasis, which means standing outside one’s self to give our individual life and struggle meaning and perspective. The role of art and scholarship is to transform us as individuals, not entertain us as a group. It is to nurture this capacity for understanding and empathy. Art and scholarship allow us to see the underlying structures and assumptions used to manipulate and control us. And this is why art, like intellectual endeavor, is feared by the corporate elite as subversive. This is why corporations have used their money to deform universities into vocational schools that spit out blinkered and illiterate systems managers. This is why the humanities are withering away.

The vast stage of entertainment that envelops our culture is intended to impart the opposite of ekstasis. Mass entertainment plays to the basest and crudest instincts of the crowd. It conditions us to have the same aspirations and desires. It forces us to speak in the same dead clichés and slogans. It homogenizes human experience. It wallows in a cloying nostalgia and sentimentalism that foster historical amnesia. It turns the Other into a cartoon or a stereotype. It prohibits empathy because it prohibits understanding. It denies human singularity and uniqueness. It assures us that we all have within us the ability, talent or luck to become famous and rich. It forms us into a lowing and compliant herd. We have been conditioned to believe—defying all the great moral and philosophical writers from Socrates to Orwell—that the aim of life is not to understand but to be entertained. If we do not shake ourselves awake from our electronic hallucinations and defy the elites who are ruining the country and trashing the planet we will experience the awful and deadly retribution of the gods.

VIDEO: BP Coverup of Environmental Catastrophe in the Gulf: Dead Birds, Fish, Turtles, and Mammals

By Washington’s Blog

VIDEO: BP Coverup of Environmental Catastrophe in the Gulf: Dead Birds, Fish, Turtles, and Mammals

BP has been trying to hide dead birds and other sealife.

Fox News reports that BP is trying to keep animal carcasses away from public view:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=f1txqDQpcoA

Local Gulf Coast residents and those monitoring turtles say that BP is removing carcasses at night to hide them from the public:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Dvd-rpvOQVQ

Jerry Cope and Charles Hambleton report:

The numbers of birds, fish, turtles, and mammals killed by the use of Corexit will never be known as the evidence strongly suggests that BP worked with the Coast Guard, the Department of Homeland Security, the FAA, private security contractors, and local law enforcement, all of which cooperated to conceal the operations disposing of the animals from the media and the public.

The majority of the disposal operations were carried out under cover of darkness. The areas along the beaches and coastal Islands where the dead animals were collected were closed off by the U.S. Coast Guard. On shore, private contractors and local law enforcement officials kept off limits the areas where the remains of the dead animals were dumped, mainly at the Magnolia Springs landfill by Waste Management where armed guards controlled access. The nearby weigh station where the Waste Management trucks passed through with their cargoes was also restricted by at least one sheriff’s deputies in a patrol car, 24/7.

Robyn Hill, who was Beach Ambassador for the City of Gulf Shores until she became so ill she collapsed on the job one morning, was at a residential condominium property adjacent to the Gulf Shores beach when she smelled an overwhelming stench. She went to see where the odor was coming from and witnessed two contract workers dumping plastic bags full of dead birds and fish in a residential Waste Management dumpster, which was then protected by a security guard. Within five minutes, a Waste Management collection truck emptied the contents and the guard departed.

Independent biologists are also being blocked from investigating wildlife.

What’s the reason for this cover up?

I had assumed that all such shenanigans were just to keep the dead wildlife away from public view.

But as the Christian Science Monitor pointed out in June:

Federal laws makes BP liable for up to $50,000 per dead animal on the endangered species list, such as a Kemp’s Ridley turtle.

It’s not just the Kemp’s Ridley. Sperm whales and hawksbill turtles are also endangered animals living in the Gulf.

So are Brown pelicans, which have been hit hard by the oil spill.

In fact, the U.S Fish and Wildlife Service lists 29 endangered species in the Gulf which could be harmed by the spill.

You already know that BP is trying to hide the amount of oil which has leaked into the Gulf in order to reduce the amount of fines it has to pay under the Clean Water Act (see this and this).

Similarly, BP is also trying to secretly dispose of endangered animals killed by the spill in order reduce its fines under the Endangered Species Act.

Washington’s Blog is a frequent contributor to Global Research. Global Research Articles by Washington’s Blog

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